What does atypical cells in a mole biopsy mean?

What does atypical cells mean in a skin biopsy?

Atypical: Cells that are not normal but are not cancerous. Atypical cells could become a cancer over time or may increase a person’s risk of cancer.

What are atypical cells in a mole?

Atypical moles, also known as dysplastic nevi, are unusual-looking moles that have irregular features under the microscope. Though benign, they are worth more of your attention because individuals with atypical moles are at increased risk for melanoma, a dangerous skin cancer.

Should I be worried about an atypical mole?

Yes. An atypical mole that is itching, painful, swelling, crusting or oozing should be checked immediately by a dermatologist or other physician experienced with skin disorders.

What percent of atypical moles become melanoma?

One study found that the risk of an atypical mole turning into melanoma over an individual’s lifetime is less than 0.1% for both men and women.

Should an atypical mole be removed?

Atypical moles should be removed when they have features suggestive of malignant transformation. Elliptical excision is the preferred removal technique. Removing all atypical moles is neither necessary nor cost effective.

How can you tell if a mole is precancerous?

What Are the Signs of a Precancerous Mole?

  1. Asymmetry. A common mole is typically symmetrical. …
  2. Border. The borders of precancerous moles are often blurred. …
  3. Color. Whereas a common mole is one color, a precancerous mole is often a mixture of various colors like brown, black, red, or blue.
  4. Diameter. …
  5. Enlarging.
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How long does melanoma take to spread?

Melanoma can grow very quickly. It can become life-threatening in as little as 6 weeks and, if untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body. Melanoma can appear on skin not normally exposed to the sun. Nodular melanoma is a highly dangerous form of melanoma that looks different from common melanomas.

Do atypical moles change over time?

Most types of atypical moles remain stable over time. Patients with five or more dysplastic nevi are 10 times more likely to develop melanoma than individuals with no atypical moles. The greater the number of dysplastic nevi on the body, the more likely the development of melanoma.