What does a mole stand for?

What is a mole and why is it significant?

A mole is a very important unit of measurement that chemists use. A mole of something means you have 602,214,076,000,000,000,000,000 of that thing, like how having a dozen eggs means you have twelve eggs. Chemists have to measure using moles for very small things like atoms, molecules, or other particles.

What are two things a mole is equal to?

Expert Answer:

  • A mole represents two things:
  • It represents a definite amount of the substance i.e. an amount of substance equal to its gram atomic mass or gram molecular mass.
  • It represents a definite number (6.022 × 1023) of atoms, molecules or ions of a substance.

Why is a mole 6.022 x10 23?

The mole (abbreviated mol) is the SI measure of quantity of a “chemical entity,” such as atoms, electrons, or protons. It is defined as the amount of a substance that contains as many particles as there are atoms in 12 grams of pure carbon-12. So, 1 mol contains 6.022×1023elementary entities of the substance.

Why is a mole a better unit than a PCU?

Reasons for moles: You can easily approximate the number of atoms from the mass of a sample because the mass number of an isotope approximately equals the mass of 1 mole of atoms in grams. It’s a historical convention that would be too expensive or uncomfortable to change now.

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What is mole explain with example?

One mole is defined as the amount of substance containing as many elementary entities (atoms, molecules, ions, electrons, radicals, etc.) as there are atoms in 12 grams of carbon – 12(6. 023×1023). The mass of one mole of a substance equals to its relative molecular mass expressed in grams.

What is the difference between mole and mol?

Answer: there is nothing diff between them. Explanation: mol is a symbol of mole.