Frequent question: Should I see a dermatologist for itchy skin?

Can a dermatologist help with itchy skin?

If your itch does not go away with home treatment, see a board-certified dermatologist. Your dermatologist can determine the cause of your itching and help you relieve it.

What doctor should I see for itchy skin?

You’re likely to start by seeing your family doctor or primary care doctor. In some cases, you may be referred to a specialist in skin diseases (dermatologist).

What am I lacking if my skin is itchy?

The causes of skin itching, or pruritis, are usually harmless. They are often linked with temporary issues, such as dry skin or a bug bite. Less commonly, problems with the nerves, kidneys, thyroid, or liver can cause itching sensations without necessarily causing a rash.

What completely stops itching?

To help soothe itchy skin, dermatologists recommend the following tips: Apply a cold, wet cloth or ice pack to the skin that itches. Do this for about five to 10 minutes or until the itch subsides. Take an oatmeal bath.

How do you stop itching that won’t go away?

An anti-itch cream is another common way to soothe itchy skin. Get an anti-itch cream that contains at least 1 percent hydrocortisone. This drug inhibits inflammatory responses in the body and can help calm inflamed, itchy skin. This cream should be used for the shortest period possible and then discontinued.

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Should I see a doctor or dermatologist for rash?

If you have a rash and notice any of the following symptoms, see a board-certified dermatologist or go to the emergency room immediately: The rash is all over your body. A rash that covers the body could indicate something concerning, such as an infection or allergic reaction. You have a fever with the rash.

What is the difference between a dermatologist and an allergist?

A dermatologist can help you choose products that are less likely to irritate your skin. An allergist may provide medications to help you manage your allergies and even provide immunotherapy to reduce your sensitivity to that substance. Fortunately, you won’t be at a loss regardless of which doctor you choose to see.

When should I be worried about itching?

See your doctor or a skin disease specialist (dermatologist) if the itching: Lasts more than two weeks and doesn’t improve with self-care measures. Is severe and distracts you from your daily routines or prevents you from sleeping. Comes on suddenly and can’t be easily explained.

Which ointment is best for itching?

If dry skin has left you with small, itchy areas on your body, an over-the-counter anti-itch cream or ointment containing 1% hydrocortisone may offer some relief. Hydrocortisone is a type of steroid medicine that helps reduce itching, redness, and swelling. If you have extreme itchiness, see a doctor.